RSS Feed

Tag Archives: Helen Hunt

Bad Date Scenes

Posted on

babymamabaddatetaxi

Valentine’s Day is drawing near, and that means an awful lot of people are feeling the pressure to put together a magical, romantic date night that will fan the flames of love. Or at least get them to second base. But not to worry. No matter what happens, it’s not likely to be anywhere near as painful as these classic movie scenes of dates gone awry.

HANNAH AND HER SISTERS (1986)

hannahandhersistersbaddate

Woody Allen and Dianne Wiest have a hilarious train wreck of a first date in “Hannah and Her Sisters,” one of Allen’s best films. She’s interested in punk rock and drugs, while he’s all about jazz piano and The Great American Songbook. He ends the date by telling her: “I had a great evening. It was like the Nuremberg trials.”

THE GRADUATE (1967)

graduatestripperscene

This one is a tragically bad date – because Dustin Hoffman is intentionally trying to show Katharine Ross a horrible time, at the request of her mother. He ignores her, belittles her and finally takes her to a strip club, forcing her to sit near the stage. The thing is, he really likes her, and that fact makes her slow transition from excitement to humiliation all the more heartbreaking.

BLIND DATE (1987)

blinddatebaddate

You’d think a blind date with Kim Basinger would be a good thing, right? Well, not when you have an ex-boyfriend stalking you and you discover your demure date becomes a wild woman after a few drinks. Poor Bruce Willis.

BABY MAMA (2008)

babymamabaddate

The great Tina Fey nails it in her bad date scene in “Baby Mama.” Here she is at a nice restaurant with a guy, and rather than ease her way into getting to know him better, she jumps right to the heart of the matter. Marriage may or may not happen some day, she says, but “I’m 37. I want a baby NOW.” The guy’s reaction – excusing himself so he can hail a cab – is perfect.

WHEN HARRY MET SALLY (1989)

whenharrymetsallybaddate

Before Harry and Sally (Billy Crystal and Meg Ryan) get together, they try to set each other up with their best friends (Bruno Kirby and Carrie Fisher). Naturally, it doesn’t go as planned. My favorite part is when the only conversation Crystal and Fisher can muster has to do with the fact they both grew up in New Jersey.

AS GOOD AS IT GETS (1997)

asgoodasitgetsbaddate

Although Jack Nicholson and Helen Hunt are an incredibly unlikely couple in this film, their attempt at a traditional date is highly entertaining. Despite all odds (and a clothing emergency), things are going pretty well until Jack reveals something that he should have kept to himself. Check, please!

LITTLE CHILDREN (2006)

littlechildrenbaddate

Similarly, the first date between Jane Adams and Jackie Earle Haley is doomed in the drama “Little Children.” This one is not for the squeamish. Haley’s character is recently out of prison for exposing himself to a minor, and Adams is a lonely woman looking for a shred of kindness and companionship. It doesn’t go well.

BYE BYE LOVE (1995)

byebyelovebaddate2

This one is my favorite. It’s by far the best thing in a truly mediocre movie about divorce and parenting, starring Paul Reiser. About midway through the movie, single dad Randy Quaid finds himself on a date from hell with Janeane Garofalo, who has some … issues. The two are great together, especially Garofalo, as they launch barbs at each other at an Italian restaurant. I’d almost forgotten how good Quaid was before he went nutjob.

But here I am again, monopolizing the conversation. What are YOUR favorite bad date scenes?

Jimbo’s Film Faves of 2012

Posted on

lincolnmovieface

Looking back, there were more than a few good flicks released in 2012 – and in many genres. Among my favorites this year were historical dramas, comedies, science fiction, a political thriller, quirky romances and some riveting character stories. Here they are, with this caveat: Due to the vagaries of movie distribution, I still haven’t seen some of the most-praised films coming out at the end of the year, including “Zero Dark Thirty” and “The Impossible.”

ARGO

argoposter

“Argo” does many things and does all of them very well. It’s a period piece, set during the Iranian hostage crisis; it’s a comedy; it’s an action/thriller. Director Ben Affleck does an amazing job of fitting all those elements together seamlessly, while taking on the starring role himself. The cast is stellar, including the great Alan Arkin and John Goodman. But what elevates “Argo” is the way it presages current events in the Middle East without beating us over the head with it.

BEASTS OF THE SOUTHERN WILD

beastsofsouthernwild2

You can’t ask for much more in a film than to have it take a locale you think you know and transform it into something utterly exotic and foreign. Here, an American bayou villageĀ  after a devastating flood becomes a new universe where a little girl (the incredible Quvenzhane Wallis) brazenly battles demons large and small. It’s one of those movies where you can’t take your eyes off the screen for a second.

FLIGHT

flight

Denzel Washington adds to his impressive roster of riveting lead performances. “Flight” is the story of a commercial pilot who makes a daring, emergency landing, then has to answer some tough questions about his personal life. The sequence inside the aircraft is truly harrowing, but it’s the downward emotional spiral later on that stays with you.

FRIENDS WITH KIDS

friendswithkidsposter

Great ensemble cast, led by Adam Scott and director Jennifer Westfeldt. I’m a sucker for witty banter, particularly when it’s coming out of the mouths of funny people who are oblivious to their own flaws. The premise has to do with two friends who decide to have a baby and not bother with any of the messy love/relationship stuff. My only quibble was with the inevitable ending. Supporting players Maya Rudolph and Chris O’Dowd are terrific.

LINCOLN

lincolnmoviepensive

Towering achievement by a trio of great collaborators – director Steven Spielberg, writer Tony Kushner and actor Daniel Day-Lewis – examining the greatest American president in one of his most crucial periods. What’s remarkable is the fact that this movie is all about a political process, with no real physical action. Why does it work? Why is it mesmerizing? Because we are drawn to Lincoln’s every word and expression. He is a monument made real for us, thanks to careful staging, brilliant words and unforgettable acting.

LOOPER

looper

For those of us who love a good time-travel movie, “Looper” is a revelation. It’s intelligent and uncompromising, with dashes of unexpected humor balancing out the flashes of violence. Joseph Gordon-Levitt, in subtle makeup, plays a hit man who is given the task of killing his older self, played by Bruce Willis. Among the superior supporting cast are Emily Blunt and Jeff Daniels.

MOONRISE KINGDOM

moonrisekingdom

Not everyone is a fan of Wes Anderson’s fragile, cinematic imaginings, but I am. It’s all about the details and quirks for Anderson, even in this tale of obsessive, young love at a summer camp in the 1960s. As with all Anderson films, the adults here, including Bill Murray, Frances McDormand, Bruce Willis, Tilda Swinton and Edward Norton, are more lost than the kids.

SALMON FISHING IN THE YEMEN

salmonfishing2

Quirkiness also abounds in this romance about an awkward scientist (Ewan McGregor) and a Yemeni sheik’s aide (Emily Blunt) who try to bring salmon fishing to the Middle East. It’s fascinating to watch McGregor and Blunt convince themselves and the audience that they’re a good match, despite all appearances.

THE SESSIONS

sessionsmovie

I don’t think “The Sessions” is about sex, although sex is discussed throughout this film about a paralyzed man (John Hawkes) who goes to a sex therapist (Helen Hunt). It’s really about affection in all of its forms, from mere acquaintanceship and friendship to platonic love and physical intimacy. Hawkes and Hunt are excellent.

SILVER LININGS PLAYBOOK

silverliningsplaybook

I absolutely loved this movie. It has real heart and soul, with laughs that billow out from deep places in your gut and honest moments of concern for these wonderfully flawed characters. Without a doubt, “Silver Linings Playbook” is the best bipolar-sports superstition-sibling rivalry-dance movie ever made. Also, big kudos to Bradley Cooper, Jennifer Lawrence, Robert DeNiro and Chris Tucker.

SLEEPWALK WITH ME

sleepwalkwithme

This movie didn’t make it to many theaters, but it’s hilarious. The brilliant stand-up comedian Mike Birbiglia wrote, directed and starred in it, and it’s based on his own life. He’s telling us the story of his early days as a comic, along with the severe sleepwalking condition that plagues him. Even when he’s explaining something terrible he did, he’s completely sympathetic.

YOUR SISTER’S SISTER

yoursisterssister

Mark Duplass, Emily Blunt and Rosemary DeWitt star in this indie feature about an incredibly complicated set of relationships between a woman, her male best friend and her sister. The acting here is top-notch, with speedy, perceptive dialogue and more than a few twists. At the heart of it is Duplass, who is an expert at conveying a very specific sort of smart, funny, pompous, wounded guy in his 30s.

I wholeheartedly recommend all of these!

On the Couch: Memorable TV & Movie Therapists

Posted on

Pop culture and therapy are an amazingly good match. First of all, most worthy comedies and dramas are populated with people facing sizable problems. Secondly, introducing a psychiatrist, psychologist or social worker cuts to the heart of the matter without special effects or car chases. It also makes for insightful writing and acting.

LORRAINE BRACCO IN “THE SOPRANOS”

Lorraine Bracco was as crucial to the success of “The Sopranos” as the sex and violence that punctuated the show. Dr. Melfi’s sessions with Tony brought clarity to the proceedings and had an electrifying intimacy separate from everything else.

BOB NEWHART IN “THE BOB NEWHART SHOW”

I have a feeling Newhart’s portrayal of psychologist Robert Hartley was more accurate than most TV and movie therapists. He used jargon, he rarely raised his voice and he kept incredibly regular office hours. Thank goodness he also treated the occasional clown.

ROBIN WILLIAMS IN “GOOD WILL HUNTING”

Not everyone is a fan of Williams as the feisty therapist helping Matt Damon in “Good Will Hunting.” I liked his performance; I thought it had tons of heart and soul. How do you like them apples?

MARIAH CAREY IN “PRECIOUS: BASED ON THE NOVEL ‘PUSH’ BY SAPPHIRE”

It’s easy to lose sight of just how good Carey is as the social worker in “Precious.” She’s as tough as she needs to be in a film about hope in the face of brutal reality. Is there anything in this world more courageous than standing up for an abused kid? An amazing job.

JUDD HIRSCH IN “ORDINARY PEOPLE”

This fine performance is central to the effectiveness of 1980’s Oscar-winning “Ordinary People.” Hirsch’s scenes with a young Timothy Hutton have a real urgency to them, while noting the limitations and boundaries of the doctor-patient relationship.

LISA KUDROW IN “WEB THERAPY”

Lisa Kudrow is a master at delivering the disarming remark. She did it to perfection on “Friends” and she continues it on “Web Therapy.” As highly-flawed Dr. Fiona Wallice, Kudrow levels her snark on everyone, including herself.

STEVE CARELL IN “HOPE SPRINGS”

For such a skilled comic actor, it’s surprising how good Carell is at playing a subdued character. This is a great quality for his therapist in “Hope Springs.” He’s patient, probing and decent, without being boring.

ALLAN ARBUS IN “M*A*S*H”

Allan Arbus was always a welcome sight on “M*A*S*H,” as psychiatrist Sidney Freedman. Funny and fatigued as that character was, his appearances never failed to remind viewers of the insanity of war.

JOANNE WOODWARD IN “SYBIL”

Joanne Woodward brought a wonderful sense of authority and humanity to her part in “Sybil.” Sally Field, as a woman with multiple personalities, had the showier role, but Woodward had to give the whole thing plausibility.

KELSEY GRAMMER IN “FRASIER”

I doubt that any actual therapist has as soothing a voice as Kelsey Grammer. On “Frasier,” he offered a tour de force of comical compassion, without hiding the quirky side of the people giving the treatment.

HELEN HUNT IN “THE SESSIONS”

Helen Hunt is her usual, decent-but-intense self in “The Sessions.” She plays a sex therapist here, and much has been made of her willingness to bare everything onscreen. I thought her most revealing scene was in a car in a motel parking lot, fully clothed.

RICHARD BURTON IN “EQUUS”

In “Equus,” Burton is a doctor treating a very disturbed young man who has blinded several horses. What unfolds during their sessions is a deep well of guilt, trauma, religion and sex. As you’d expect, Burton brings heaps of dramatic heft to the part, for which he earned an Oscar nomination.

DYLAN McDERMOTT IN “AMERICAN HORROR STORY”

Worst. Therapist. Ever. I don’t know where this joker went to school, but I’m pretty sure they tell you on the very first day, “Don’t have sex with patients who are ghosts.”

JANE LYNCH IN “TWO AND A HALF MEN”

As Charlie Sheen’s therapist on TV’s “Two and a Half Men,” Lynch was able to talk tough, but also be sympathetic. It was a clever way to reveal Sheen’s – I mean the character’s – insecurities and motivations.

BILLY CRYSTAL IN “ANALYZE THIS”

Light fare, to be sure, but Crystal generated very solid laughs as a shrink forced to work with a mobster in “Analyze This.” He clearly loved being in a film with Robert DeNiro, who was in full self-parody mode.

J.K. SIMMONS IN “LAW AND ORDER”

What a superb job Simmons did with this small, occasional role as a psychiatrist who sometimes testifies in court cases on the various “Law and Order” shows. He was calm, yet razor-sharp in his scenes evaluating suspects and victims; he could seem jaded and cynical, yet also honest and hardworking.

ANNA KENDRICK IN “50/50”

Therapists have to start somewhere, right? It was brilliant to have Anna Kendrick as the inexperienced caregiver to cancer patient Joseph Gordon-Levitt. It flipped the normal power dynamic and felt much more real.

RICHARD DREYFUSS IN “WHAT ABOUT BOB?”

This movie about a therapist (Dreyfuss) who can’t get away from a patient (Bill Murray) has many devoted fans. Dreyfuss gamely gives in to the rising exasperation the part calls for, which is why it works so well.

BRUCE WILLIS IN “THE SIXTH SENSE”

What I often like about Bruce Willis is his ability to be very still. It comes in quite handy in “The Sixth Sense,” where he’s trying to help Haley Joel Osment deal with a … tricky situation. Willis listens with a thoughtful intensity.

GABRIEL BYRNE IN “IN TREATMENT”

“In Treatment” isn’t simply a great TV show about therapy; I think it’s one of the best shows ever. Byrne plays Dr. Paul Weston, whose patients range from a cancer patient and a troubled businessman to a little boy caught in the middle of his parents’ divorce. Each season, the show tracked the progress of several patients, session by session. Byrne is astonishing, as is the delicate-yet-powerful writing.

But I see our time is up. I didn’t even get to the therapists in “Annie Hall,” “Mad Men” or “The Prince of Tides.” Which are your favorites?